PA310906.jpg

kelp tableware that can be returned to the sea.

 
Website Exports13.jpg

This set of tableware presents an alternative to single-use plastics through an ecological design approach and the harnessing of seaweeds natural properties.

The kelp tableware operates as one component of a larger experimental process taken with this material. Each aspect of this journey was documented and analysed, in the hope that the work can contribute to a broader discussion on the use of new materials as a way to re-interpret our society’s consumption of resources.

PA310935.jpeg
 

manufacture.

Seaweed pressed, dried and trimmed.

Website Exports6.jpg
 

mold making.

Two part press molds were designed with the manufacture process in mind. These were machined from Acetal plastic.

Due to its size the molds for the plate were machined from timber.

Website Exports9.jpg
 

prototyping.

Though this product operates in some capacity as a concept piece it is important the design is still functional and engaging. Each product was 3D printed to test the strength and ergonomics of each design.

Website Exports10.jpg
 

modeling.

With projects like this there is a danger that the final product can be a little crude. The constrained nature of computer modeling allowed a level of refinement to come into each piece. Emphasis was placed on creating resolved, functional forms which looked to elevate the material.

Each part is designed to be a functional, single use item which stacks well and uses minimal material. It was important to ensure the set sat comfortably together as a family of objects. This has been achieved by the use of the wavy, organic line as a consistent motif, as well as the logo which is embossed on all parts. 

Website Exports2.jpg
 

design development.

Much of the form development in this process was done through sketching countless iterations. Personally I find the process of repetition beneficial in ironing out ideas and key elements. 

 
 

design research.

Design inspiration was not so much taken from other products but instead from the landscapes and forms of the coastline where the seaweed is grows.